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Horgg the Dismantler

Mutant Earth
by Shocka

After the glowing review for the first figure in this line, we're moving onto the next and not-quite-so-impressive-but-still-awesome toy in Stan Winston's Mutant Earth, the hulking Horgg the Dismantler.

Horgg A junk trader on his home planet, Horgg has come to Earth in search of spare parts. With the cache of weapons and machines he's found so far, his goal is to return to Odonn filthy rich. No one will get in the way of his unstoppable greed.

With this line, Stan Winston has given us a variety of creatures to fit the different stereotypes and alien designs we've come to know and love in popular literature. As one of the alien figures from the line, Horgg fits the description of a big, solid hulking alien monster, ugly and mutated, mechanized with different pieces of rusted futuristic machinery to cover his filthy rotting flesh, opposing to the other alien Gallowz, which is instead more organic and Gieger-like.

balls Standing 7" tall, Horgg is impressively sculpted and detailed to give McToys a run for their money. His hideous four-eyed face and genital-like chin look blobby, with lovingly highlighted colors showing off the deformed flesh. His skin isn't shown much, except for his face and one disfigured arm, with three tentacle-like fingers, all very fluid, as if he's melting.

The rest of his body is all metallic and mechanical - he has a variety of tools/weapons hanging from his metal belt, many on chains, which run up his back. His mechanical torso appears to be have been crudely made wiring lots of different pieces together, fitting his character as a junk trader. It's obvious what different parts once were, like a fuel tank and part of a US spacecraft, and it adds to the overall effect of the character. Several tubes connect all over his body, made out of soft-rubber plastic so they don't impose the articulation.

Mmmm, pointy... The most impressive detailing on the figure is his lumbering right arm, a massive lumbering drill-saw thing with a variety of blades, circular saws and drills working together to mesh up anything that gets in Horgg's way. The detail on this and pretty much everything else on this figure is just mindblowing, and the paint apps are excellent - a little overspray here and there, but it looks sooooo good.

Where Horgg is so lovingly detailed, sculpted and painted, he loses points for articulation. Horgg has movement in the right shoulder, left elbow and hand, neck, midsection and legs, for a total of seven places of articulation. Not much by today's standards, but it still leaves him poseable enough to be a lot of fun, and for such a heavy figure, he has no problem standing. In other words, it works, which is more than I can say for a lot of overly articulated toys.

dismantled Horgg comes with four accessories - two earring-like hooks, which clip onto the side of his body - and an awesome two-part base. Like all the Mutant Earth toys, he comes with a base suited to his personality, and this base is perfect: it features a sandy plain with wreckage debris, and a half-mutant, half-cyborg corpse buried into the debris. The corpse is a beautiful thing to admire as is, but throw in the fact that its arm hangs in place from an open wound/shoulder, and can be removed to play with, and it's a sick work of art. I love it; it's simple, but full of ingenuity.

This figure impressed me much more than I expected, another great figure from this unexpected, impressive line - a must own for sci-fi horror monster fans.


Pissed at Shocka for getting the Mutant Earth figures for so cheap? Want to laugh at him since he has to wait for everything else and pay double the price? Tell us on our message board, the Loafing Lounge.

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