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Aurra Sing

SWI: The Phantom Menace
by yo go re

Fun fact: when this character was originally designed, the only name they gave her was "Babe Fett."

Aurra Sing is a Force-sensitive bounty hunter, mercenary and assassin. She is willing to work for anyone who can meet her price. Many aspiring hunters seek her out for training despite her reputation as a cold-hearted taskmaster.

Since Aurra's entire on-screen appearance involved standing in one spot and turning her head slightly, all that info comes from the Expanded Universe. The comics have revealed that Aurra is the daughter of a drugged-out human mother and an unknown father, and that she was a padawan to the Dark Woman until she was kidnapped by pirates who played on her fears of abandonment to make her hate the Jedi. She was later captured by a Hutt crimelord, who sent her off for assassin training, turning her into the woman she is today. Well whenever "today" was long ago in a galaxy far, far away. Or maybe still today - whatever species her father was has an incredibly long lifespan, and so does she.

Aurra was portrayed (as much as she required "portrayal") by Michonne Bourriague, a model. The face is more severe than you might expect, but looking at official photography of her, it's not that far off the mark. She has dark circles under her eyes, and the antenna for her brain-computer pokes up out of her scalp. She looks creepy and good!

The body is simple, but since she just wore a tight red jumpsuit, that's to be expected. There are a few wrinkles near the knees and a seam down the center, but that's all. She has red stripes tied around her wrists and her left bicep, and her boots are brown. There are even a few beads sculpted into the braids in her ponytail.

Her vest and holsters are separate pieces, rather than sculpted on. The holsters are slung on each hip, and even loop around her legs just above the knee, like real ones would. The vest is molded with various small details, like cartridges in the slots on her chest, and technological doo-dads on her back. It's all very nice work, and makes the figure look better than she would if all that were just sculpted on (like the last movie version was).

Like Mawhonic before her, Aurra Sing was designed for the black-carded Vintage Collection, but was released first as a Walmart exclusive. That means two things. First, the back of her card has a neat 3D image of her standing in front of a rocky Tatooine backdrop. Second, she has a ton of great articulation: balljointed head, swivel/hinge shoulders and elbows, swivel wrists and torso, T-crotch and swivel/hinge knees. The only thing missing is ankles, and those aren't really a necessity.

Aurra's got some really nice accessories. There's her trademark oversized slugthrower rifle, two small blasters that fit in her holsters, and a case with slots to hold four lightsabers. She also gets three new lightsaber hilts to store in there, but one of them is too long to actually fit properly. Whoops! Nice effort, though. And the empty slot means you can have her capture one more from whomever you want.

For whatever reason, the fanboys all assumed that Aurra Sing would be important in the prequels, but we were wrong. After her two-second starring role in the first movie, she was never seen again. It was only the comics and the cartoon that made her a person of interest, but they certainly did a pretty good job of it. No matter what you think of the character, she's got a striking visual (which probably had a lot to do with why people cared about her in the first place), and the toy re-creates that very well. A lot better than my old custom, that's for sure!

-- 06/10/12


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